With our beloved Dallas Cowboys at 2-3 and preparing for the Carolina Panthers, we thought we’d show you a photo of an awesome carved Halloween pumpkin that sort of looks like one of our Dallas Cowboys….Is this incredible or what? Check out these other incredibly carved pumpkins here and here

 

The tradition of carving a lantern started in the British Isles England,Scotland and Ireland where it was traditionally carved from a turnip, They were created on All Hallows’ Eve and used in a Procession around the building or left on the door step to ward off evil spirits. An offering or, as we now know it, a “treat”, would also be commonly left to placate roaming sprites and evil spirits — otherwise they might ‘fiddle’ with property or livestock (play a “trick”). Once the tradition moved to the US, it was adapted to carving the fruit of the pumpkin plant as they were more readily available, bigger and easier to carve. Throughout Northern Ireland and Northern England and Scotland, there is a long tradition of carving lanterns from vegetables, particularly the turnip, mangelwurzel, or rutabaga or a beet was used. The turnip has traditionally been used in Northern England, Ireland and Scotland at Halloween.

 

Immigrants to North America used the larger native pumpkin, which are both readily available and much larger – making them easier to carve than turnips. While turnips have always been used in Ireland and Northern England, lanterns in Scotland were originally fashioned from the thick stem of a cabbage plant, and were called “kail-runt torches”. It was not until 1837 that jack-o’-lantern appeared as a term for a carved vegetable lantern,[5] and the carved pumpkin lantern association with Halloween is recorded in 1866. In the United States, the carved pumpkin was first associated with the harvest season in general, long before it became an emblem of Halloween. In 1900, an article on Thanksgiving entertaining recommended a lit jack-o’-lantern as part of the festivities.

 

 

carved-football-player dallas cowboys pumpkin

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